Why Dyslexia Need Not Stop You Aiming High

famous dyslexic Richard Branson. Image Credit: INMA/Jarle NaustvikDo you ever feel as if your dyslexia keeps you from even setting big goals, let alone reaching them? Do you feel that you can’t aspire to the things you’d really like to accomplish, because of your dyslexia?

There are several reasons you should shoot for your real dreams instead of feeling you can’t accomplish anything significant.

Consider the following people: Thomas Edison, Cher, Walt Disney, Richard Branson, Jay Leno, Whoopi Goldberg, Ted Turner and Winston Churchill.

You probably would agree that all of these people have achieved both fame and success. They have that in common. They also are, or were all dyslexic. These individuals are positive proof that you can achieve your goals in spite of your dyslexia.

You have many talents and skills. Dyslexia is not an all-encompassing disability. Your difficulties reading do not have to prevent you from accomplishing everything you dream of.

Howard Gardner’s theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI) discusses eight domains of intelligence, including bodily kinaesthetic, musical, spatial and intrapersonal. You can, and should, use your own multiple intelligences to change your life, your community and your world

You cannot choose your body or your brain, but you can choose your thoughts. Because your thoughts determine your feelings, you can also choose how you will feel and how you will react to any given situation.

This means you can choose to set high goals and go after them. You can choose to think positively and believe in yourself. And you can choose to take action toward your goals even when you feel discouraged.

If you set a low goal, you miss the opportunity to do something great. If you set a high goal for yourself and fall short, you will still, most likely, accomplish something remarkable. If you reach a low goal, you’ve still only done something minor. If you miss the low goal, you’re likely to be disappointed with your results.

Albert Einstein said, “It is better to shoot for the stars and miss, than aim at the gutter and hit it.”

Living a mediocre life is discouraging, disheartening and completely unnecessary. If you feel that you don’t have what it takes or that you cannot possibly attain great heights because of your dyslexia, consider the life you resign yourself to if you set your sights low.

Think about a time when you set a goal, in sports or when learning an instrument or when learning something new. How did it feel to reach your goal? That satisfaction creates a powerful force in life and enhances our joy.

Living with dyslexia is not always easy. Certainly reaching your biggest goals will not always be easy. That is one reason you should pursue those goals. Pushing yourself to achieve ever-greater accomplishments and constantly be a better person and be better at what you do creates deep satisfaction and fulfilment.

Quite simply, you will be happier and healthier, emotionally and physically, if you set yourself challenging goals and strive with all your might to reach them.